Antique - Vintage Setting


If you are a lover of old-school fashions and fascinated by times gone by, you will love rings with a vintage setting. When it comes to antique style rings, you have plenty of different options to choose from, as these rings are designed to fit specific time periods, for example, there are Victorian, Art Nouveau, Renaissance, Georgian, Edwardian, and Art Deco styles, plus many more.


So, let’s take a look at some of the popular ring styles from different eras:


Art Deco – This is the most recent style of ring we’re going to look at. These rings were created between 1920 and 1930. They tended to feature many colourful jewels, and diamond and platinum were also incorporated.


Edwardian – This was when platinum started to be used for engagement bands, which is why the majority of rings from this era, from 1900 to 1920, were made using platinum. Diamonds and sapphires were popular at this time.


Victorian – This is the period from 1835 to 1900. Pearls and diamonds were popular, as was yellow gold and rose gold.
Art Nouveau – The Art Nouveau period occurred during the early 1800s. Nature elements, such as animal and floral designs, were often incorporated.


Georgian – It was all about extravagance during the 1700s. Rings tended to boast a lot of diamonds, and there was great emphasis on gemstone symmetry.


Renaissance – This was the early 1500s, and rings around this time were very unique. Gimmel rings were popular, which consisted of two or three rings linked together as one.


One of the key attributes of all vintage rings is the intricate detailing, with two common forms of delicate adornment being milgrain and filigree. Milgrain is a term that is used to describe a form of embellishment that is a common feature of antique rings, as it gives them a vintage look, with small metal balls adoring the crown of the ring and the sides of the band. Filigree is a term that is used for a delicate type of metalwork that solders twisted threads of metal or tiny metal beads to the jewel’s surface.